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State Standards 

Standards and Competencies for Digital Electronics (Course # 3821)

  Begin-End Yr
Standard 1 - Students will demonstrate the use of gates and counters in logic circuits. 2009 -
     1.1 - Construct logic circuits using gates. 2009 -
     1.2 - Construct logic circuits using flip-flops, counters, and gates. 2009 -
Standard 2 - Students will demonstrate the use of oscillators in logic circuits. 2009 -
     2.1 - Examine the functions of RC (resistor and capacitor) and crystal-controlled oscillators. 2009 -
     2.2 - Construct RC and crystal-controlled oscillators. 2009 -
Standard 3 - Students will demonstrate the functions of and be able to operate switches and multiplexers in signal distribution. 2009 -
     3.1 - Use digitally controlled analog switches to control analog and digital signal distribution. 2009 -
     3.2 - Use analog switches to perform multiplexing functions. 2009 -
Standard 4 - Students will demonstrate the functions of and be able to operate analog and digital convertors. 2009 -
     4.1 - Compare and contrast analog and digital data. 2009 -
     4.2 - Determine sampling rates required for input signals. 2009 -
     4.3 - Interpret and create block diagrams of D/A (digital/analog) and A/D convertors. 2009 -
Standard 5 - Students will program and modify microcontrollers. 2009 -
     5.1 - Use and modify microcontroller features. 2009 -
     5.2 - Explore microcontroller support devices. 2009 -
     5.3 - Program microcontrollers. 2009 -
Standard 6 - Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace. 2009 -
     6.1 - Demonstrate dignity in work. 2009 -
     6.2 - Participate in TSA as an integral part of classroom instruction. 2009 -
     6.3 - Evaluate school, community, and workplace situations by applying problem-solving and decision-making skills. 2009 -
     6.4 - Demonstrate the ability to work professionally with others. 2009 -
Standard 7 - Students will perform safety examinations and maintain safety records. 2009 -
     7.1 - Pass with 100 % accuracy a written examination relating to safety issues. 2009 -
     7.2 - Pass with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating specifically to tools and equipment. 2009 -
     7.3 - Maintain a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

 

Standards and Competencies for Computer Integrated Manufacturing (PLTW) (Course # 5794)

  Begin-End Yr
Standard 1 - Students will demonstrate personal management skills. 2009 -
     1.1 - Manage time and resources. 2009 -
     1.2 - Cultivate positive personal attitudes. 2009 -
Standard 2 - Students will demonstrate teamwork, problem solving, and decision-making skills required for success in manufacturing-related careers. 2009 -
     2.1 - Cultivate teamwork abilities within a diverse group. 2009 -
     2.2 - Demonstrate problem solving and decision making abilities. 2009 -
Standard 3 - Students will demonstrate safe practices and injury prevention and treatment in a manufacturing environment. 2009 -
     3.1 - Use reference materials to locate safety guidelines and regulations. 2009 -
     3.2 - Analyze safety hazards and prevention procedures for the manufacturing industry. 2009 -
     3.3 - Perform first aid in manufacturing situations. 2009 -
Standard 4 - Students will make and interpret measurements commonly required in manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     4.1 - Use common measurement tools to perform measurements to appropriate standards of accuracy and precision. 2009 -
     4.2 - Interpret measurements encountered in the manufacturing workplace. 2009 -
Standard 5 - Students will implement quality and statistical process control procedures to ensure and improve quality in manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     5.1 - Analyze the contributing factors to an industrial process. 2009 -
     5.2 - Use statistical process control concepts to evaluate and modify manufacturing processes. 2009 -
Standard 6 - Students will demonstrate the appropriate use of technologies used in machining and manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     6.1 - Investigate the chemical and physical properties of materials used in manufacturing. 2009 -
     6.2 - Demonstrate the steps involved in bench layout processes for milling, cutting, welding, and machining operations. 2009 -
     6.3 - Demonstrate basic proficiency in common manufacturing machining operations. 2009 -
Standard 7 - Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace. 2009 -
     7.1 - Demonstrate dignity in work. 2009 -
     7.2 - Participate in SkillsUSA as an integral part of classroom instruction. 2009 -
     7.3 - Evaluate school, community, and workplace situations by applying problem-solving and decision-making skills. 2009 -
     7.4 - Demonstrate the ability to work professionally with others. 2009 -
Standard 8 - Students will perform safety examinations and maintain safety records. 2009 -
     8.1 - Pass with 100% accuracy a written examination relating specifically to safety issues. 2009 -
     8.2 - Pass with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating specifically to tools and equipment. 2009 -
     8.3 - Maintain a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor

 

 

Standards and Competencies for Principles of Manufacturing (Course # 5781)

  Begin-End Yr
Standard 1 - Students will analyze the components of a manufacturing system. 2009 -
     1.1 - Analyze the systems common to manufacturing organizations. 2009 -
     1.2 - Evaluate the role of customers in the manufacturing process. 2009 -
Standard 2 - Students will adapt processes to meet customer needs using quality principles. 2009 -
     2.1 - Assess the effects of quality assurance on manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     2.2 - Analyze the relationship between process management and quality assurance. 2009 -
Standard 3 - Students will access, test, record, organize and evaluate information typical of a manufacturing workplace. 2009 -
     3.1 - Access and process data commonly used in manufacturing. 2009 -
     3.2 - Test data relevant to manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     3.3 - Record data relevant to manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     3.4 - Organize data relevant to manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     3.5 - Evaluate data relevant to manufacturing processes. 2009 -
Standard 4 - Students will analyze the fundamental organizational components of manufacturing organizations. 2009 -
     4.1 - Analyze organizational designs and structures. 2009 -
     4.2 - Analyze organizational systems and processes. 2009 -
     4.3 - Assess the role of personal accountability within an organization. 2009 -
Standard 5 - Students will analyze the fundamental economic components and functions of manufacturing organizations. 2009 -
     5.1 - Analyze the basic economic principles that impact manufacturing operations. 2009 -
     5.2 - Draw conclusions and make inferences from company financial statements. 2009 -
     5.3 - Contrast the costs of preventive maintenance and safety practices with the costs of equipment repair and workplace accidents. 2009 -
Standard 6 - Students will implement quality and statistical process control procedures to ensure and improve quality in manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     6.1 - Analyze the contributing factors to an industrial process. 2009 -
     6.2 - Use statistical process control concepts to evaluate and modify manufacturing processes. 2009 -
Standard 7 - Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace. 2009 -
     7.1 - Exhibit positive leadership skills. 2009 -
     7.2 - Participate in SkillsUSA as an integral part of classroom instruction. 2009 -
     7.3 - Assess situations and apply problem-solving and decision-making skills to particular client relations in the community, and workplace. 2009 -
     7.4 - Demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively with others in a professional setting. 2009 -
Standard 8 - Students will perform safety examinations and maintain safety records. 2009 -
     8.1 - Pass with 100 percent accuracy a written examination relating to safety issues. 2009 -
     8.2 - Pass with 100percent accuracy a performance examination relating to safety. 2009 -
     8.3 - Maintain a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

Standards and Competencies for Principles of Machining and Manufacturing (Course # 5782)

  Begin-End Yr
Standard 1 - Students will demonstrate personal management skills. 2009 -
     1.1 - Manage time and resources. 2009 -
     1.2 - Cultivate positive personal attitudes. 2009 -
Standard 2 - Students will demonstrate teamwork, problem solving, and decision-making skills required for success in manufacturing-related careers. 2009 -
     2.1 - Cultivate teamwork abilities within a diverse group. 2009 -
     2.2 - Demonstrate problem solving and decision making abilities. 2009 -
Standard 3 - Students will demonstrate safe practices and injury prevention and treatment in a manufacturing environment. 2009 -
     3.1 - Use reference materials to locate safety guidelines and regulations. 2009 -
     3.2 - Analyze safety hazards and prevention procedures for the manufacturing industry. 2009 -
     3.3 - Perform first aid in manufacturing situations. 2009 -
Standard 4 - Students will make and interpret measurements commonly required in manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     4.1 - Use common measurement tools to perform measurements to appropriate standards of accuracy and precision. 2009 -
     4.2 - Interpret measurements encountered in the manufacturing workplace. 2009 -
Standard 5 - Students will implement quality and statistical process control procedures to ensure and improve quality in manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     5.1 - Analyze the contributing factors to an industrial process. 2009 -
     5.2 - Use statistical process control concepts to evaluate and modify manufacturing processes. 2009 -
Standard 6 - Students will demonstrate the appropriate use of technologies used in machining and manufacturing processes. 2009 -
     6.1 - Investigate the chemical and physical properties of materials used in manufacturing. 2009 -
     6.2 - Demonstrate the steps involved in bench layout processes for milling, cutting, welding, and machining operations. 2009 -
     6.3 - Demonstrate basic proficiency in common manufacturing machining operations. 2009 -
Standard 7 - Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace. 2009 -
     7.1 - Demonstrate dignity in work. 2009 -
     7.2 - Participate in SkillsUSA as an integral part of classroom instruction. 2009 -
     7.3 - Evaluate school, community, and workplace situations by applying problem-solving and decision-making skills. 2009 -
     7.4 - Demonstrate the ability to work professionally with others. 2009 -
Standard 8 - Students will perform safety examinations and maintain safety records. 2009 -
     8.1 - Pass with 100percent accuracy a written examination relating specifically to safety issues. 2009 -
     8.2 - Pass with 100percent accuracy a performance examination relating specifically to tools and equipment. 2009 -
     8.3 - Maintain a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor

 

 

 

INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Intro to Electromechanical is a course that will introduce students to basic skills and knowledge applicable to all construction trades and the basic electromechanical skills necessary in a manufacturing facility. Topics covered include safety, construction drawings,

site layout, hand and power tools, linear and angular measurements, and application of

algebraic and geometric principles to construction problems.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is strongly recommended that administration and guidance follow the scope and sequence and course recommendations as listed.

 

Recommended Credits:                    1 with a minimum of 72.5 hours dedicated to the Intro to Electromechanical curriculum to meet National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) standards

 

Recommended Grade Level(s):       9th   10th   11th

(Not recommended for seniors due to pathway and concentrator articulation)

 

Number of Competencies in Course:           59

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

STANDARDS

 

 

1.0       Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace.

 

 

2.0       Students will identify and demonstrate basic principles of safety procedures used in the construction industry.

 

 

3.0       Students will interpret drawings and written specifications and relate them to the construction layout.

 

 

4.0       Students will trace the growth and development of the construction industry.

 

 

5.0       Students will evaluate career opportunities and career paths within the construction industry.

 

 

6.0       Students will identify, select, inspect, safely use, maintain, and store hand tools.

 

 

7.0       Students will identify, select, inspect, safely use, maintain, and store power tools.

 

 

8.0       Students will make and lay out linear and angular measurements.

 

 

9.0       Students will transfer mathematics concepts to solve problems encountered in the construction industry.

 

 

10.0     Students will rig and move materials and equipment.

 

 

11.0     Students will demonstrate proficiency in creating two- and three-dimensional scale drawings.

 

12.0     Students will demonstrate job-seeking skills and exhibit employability characteristics required for employability and job retention in the workplace.

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

STANDARD 1.0

 

Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the

school, community, and workplace.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

1.1       Cultivate leadership skills.

1.2       Participate in SkillsUSA or similar organization, including professional organizations.

1.3       Assess situations within the school, community, and workplace and apply values to develop and select solutions.

1.4              Demonstrate the ability to work cooperatively with others.

1.5       Exhibit integrity and pride in artisanship

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

1.1A    Takes initiative in meetings to actively influence the results of deliberations.

1.1B    Uses critical-thinking and consensus building skills in group deliberations.

1.2A    Applies high ethical standards to personal, community, and professional situations.

1.2B    Participates and conducts meetings according to accepted rules of parliamentary procedure.

1.3A    Analyzes simulated workplace situations and uses problem-solving and critical-thinking techniques to suggest solutions the problem.

1.3B    Analyzes socio-economic conflicts associated with the construction industry and applies values to evaluate possible ways to mitigate the conflicts.

1.4A    Participates in a committee.

1.4B    Contributes to a group project.

1.5       Exhibits integrity and pride in artisanship.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Create a leadership inventory and use it to conduct a personal assessment.

·         Participate in various SkillsUSA or similar programs and/or competitive events.

·         Evaluate a civic project within the school, community, and/or workplace and evaluate the expected long-term effects of the project.

·         Prepare a meeting agenda for a school or a community meeting.

·         Attend the meeting of a professional organization.

·         Participate in a design team to complete an assigned project.

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program, SkillsUSA, SkillsUSA Total Quality Curriculum, Communication and Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

STANDARD 2.0

 

Students will identify and demonstrate basic principles of safety procedures used in the

construction industry.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

2.1              Demonstrate a positive attitude regarding safety practices and issues.

2.2       Use personal protective equipment.

2.3       Demonstrate safe operating procedures with tools and equipment, such as hand and power tools, ladders, scaffolding, and lifting equipment.

2.4              Follow safe procedures to move or hoist materials or objects.

2.5       Explain the importance of the HazCom (Hazard Communication Standard) requirement and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS).

2.6       Adhere to responsibilities, regulations, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) policies regarding reporting of accidents.

2.7       Practice fire prevention in dealing with various flammable materials.

2.8              Demonstrate appropriate construction-related safety procedures.

2.9              Pass with 100 % accuracy a written examination relating to construction safety issues.

2.10          Pass with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating to construction safety.

2.11     Maintain a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

2.1A    Is attentive during safety discussions.

2.1B    Responds positively to instruction, advice, and correction regarding safety issues.

2.1C    Does not deliberately create or increase hazards, such as by horseplay, practical jokes, or creating distractions.

2.2       Uses the recommended personal protective equipment for the assigned task.

2.3A    Inspects power tools for intact guards, shields, insulation, and other protective devices.

2.3B    Prior to use, inspects extension cords for the presence of a functional ground connection.

2.3C    Operates and maintains tools in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions and as required by regulation or company policy.

2.3D    Properly places and secures ladders and scaffolding prior to use.

2.4A    Demonstrates the ability to manually lift a heavy object in a safe manner.

2.4B    Uses safe procedures, including proper rigging, to hoist heavy objects.

2.5A    Retrieves MSDSs and identifies the health hazards associated with materials.

2.5B    Explains the employee’s role under HazCom (Hazard Communication Standard).

2.6A    Reports all injuries to self to the immediate supervisor/instructor.

2.6B.   Complies with personal assignments regarding emergency assignments.

2.7A    Describes fire prevention and fire fighting techniques.

2.7B    Explains the classes of fires and the types of extinguishers used on each.

2.7C    Operates one of the fire extinguishers found on construction job sites.

2.8A    Is observant of safety issues and concerns relevant to the construction industry

2.8B    Complies with all safety guidelines and regulations set forth by industry and OSHA.

2.9       Passes with 100 % accuracy a written examination relating construction safety issues.

2.10     Passes with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating to construction safety.

2.11     Maintains a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Complete a site evaluation for safe practices.

·         Appraise the job site for safety hazards, list common causes of typical accidents and injuries, and outline a safety corrections program.

·         Calculate the cost of safety corrections needed.

·         Conduct a roundtable discussion on the problems of substance abuse on the job site.

·         Complete a report on injuries, accidents, and near misses, including how each could be prevented.

·         Explain the tags used to identify a scaffold condition.

·         Use proper, professional terms relating to the construction industry.

 

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, SkillsUSA Total Quality Curriculum, Communication and Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

STANDARD 3.0

 

Students will interpret drawings and written specifications and relate them to the construction layout.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

3.1       Interpret dimensions and locations of components that are explicitly dimensioned in construction drawings and written specifications.

3.2              Scale dimensions that are not explicitly included in construction drawings.

3.3       Interpret plan and elevation views shown in construction drawings.

3.4       Recognize and interpret lines and symbols commonly used in construction drawings.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

3.1A    Relates information on prints to real parts and locations.

3.1B    Explains the tolerances associated with dimensions in construction drawings.

3.1C    Uses dimensions indicated on a drawing to make calculations, such as area and volume.

3.2A    Uses the scale of a drawing to determine locations not explicitly dimensioned.

3.2B    Uses the scale of a drawing to determine dimensions not explicitly shown on drawing.

3.2C    Uses dimensions scaled from a drawing to make calculations, such as area and volume.

3.3       Interprets three-dimensional features found in construction drawings.

3.4A    Distinguishes object lines, dimension and extension lines, center lines, section lines, and other lines commonly found in construction drawings.

3.4B    Identifies symbols commonly used in construction drawings, including material, window and door, electrical, plumbing, HVAC, and plot plan and survey symbols.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Calculate the number of square feet in a house from the information given on a floor plan.

·         Determine the number of exits available in a building based on construction drawings.

·         Plan fire escape routes based on construction drawings or floor plans for their school.

·         Estimate walking distances for each unique fire escape route suggested in the preceding project.

·         Determine the rise and run of a stairway depicted on a construction drawing.

·         Identify number and location of convenience electric outlets depicted on a construction

drawing.

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communication and Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

STANDARD 4.0

 

Students will trace the growth and development of the construction industry.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

4.1              Analyze the evolution of the construction industry.

4.2       Analyze current cultural and economic indicators to anticipate future trends in the construction industry.

4.3       Explore economic aspects, the free enterprise system, and the role of government as they relate to the construction industry.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

4.1A    Compares and contrasts construction techniques used in previous centuries versus current methods.

4.1B    Analyzes recent changes in the construction industry and describes the effects of the changes.

4.2       Identifies key influences for change within the industry, which are based on societal, cultural, educational, and economic trends.

4.3A    Collects and presents information related to government agencies and legislation concerning the construction industry.

4.3B    Describes the effects of market factors on the construction industry.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Research industry history, trends and construction pioneers from the Internet, media research interviews, and other research sources.

·         Debate the economic impact of the free enterprise system on the construction industry.

·         Conduct interviews and gather data from individuals concerning the growth and development of the construction industry.

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, SkillsUSA Total Quality Curriculum, Language Arts, Foreign Language, Science, Algebra, Geometry, Social Studies and Government, History, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Communication Skills,

Teamwork Skills, Leadership Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary

Skills (SCANS), Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education Research (NCCER), Department of Labor.

 

 

INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

STANDARD 5.0

 

Students will evaluate career opportunities and career paths within the construction industry.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

5.1       Examine various fields of work and related occupations within the construction industry.

5.2       Explain the titles, roles, and functions of individuals engaged in construction careers, including opportunities for advancement.

5.3              Investigate employment and entrepreneurial opportunities.

5.4       Evaluate personal characteristics required for working in the construction industry.

5.5       Investigate post-secondary education, professional organizations, and trade publications appropriate for continuing education.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

5.1       Researches at least one field of work of interest in the construction industry and the related            occupations.

5.2A    Differentiates between various construction fields and the types of work performed by each.

5.2B    Compares the roles and functions of people in construction careers.

5.3A    Researches and develops a projection of industry trends related to career opportunities.

5.3B    Compares career plans for various career paths in the construction industry.

5.4       Profiles personal characteristics, which are beneficial to the success of a professional in the construction industry.

5.5       Sets up and maintains a file outlining professional organizations, publications, current issues, future trends, and emerging technologies in the construction industry.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Interview construction workers in an occupation of interest about the job, including duties and employment requirements.

·         Research career opportunities in the local community.

·         Develop a profile of career opportunities.

·         Develop a personal career plan.

·         Appraise professional construction organizations and explain their purposes and ways they benefit the industry and its professionals.

·         Research and present information on key individuals in the construction industry.

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, SkillsUSA Total Quality Curriculum, Communication and Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Computer Science Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

STANDARD 6.0

 

Students will identify, select, inspect, safely use, maintain, and store hand tools.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

6.1       Demonstrate the proper use of striking tools.

6.2       Demonstrate the proper use of cutting tools.

6.3       Demonstrate the proper use of torque producing tools.

6.4       Demonstrate the proper use of leveling and squaring tools.

6.5       Demonstrate the proper use of grinding and shaping tools.

6.6       Demonstrate the proper use of clamping tools.

6.7       Demonstrate the proper use of pulling and lifting tools.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

6.1A    Selects the appropriate striking tool, e.g., hammers and sledge hammers.

6.1B    Demonstrates eye-to-hand coordination and manual dexterity with striking tools.

6.1C    Uses safe operating practices with striking tools.

6.1D    Inspects and maintains striking tools.

6.2A    Selects the appropriate cutting tool, e.g., handsaws, chisels, knives, and planes.

6.2B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with cutting tools.

6.2C    Uses safe operating practices with cutting tools.

6.2D    Inspects and maintains cutting tools.

6.2E    Makes precise cuts with cutting tools.

6.2F     Sharpens cutting tools, e.g., knives, saws, and chisels.

6.3A    Selects the appropriate torque-producing tool, e.g., screwdrivers, wrenches, and pliers.

6.3B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with torque-producing tools.

6.3C    Uses safe operating practices with torque-producing tools.

6.3D    Inspects and maintains torque-producing tools.

6.4A    Selects the appropriate leveling and squaring tool, e.g., builder’s squares, try squares, plumb bobs, levels, and builder’s levels.

6.4B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with leveling and squaring tools.

6.4C    Uses safe operating practices with leveling and squaring tools.

6.4D    Inspects and maintains leveling and squaring tools.

6.5A    Selects the appropriate grinding and shaping tool, e.g., files, hand sanders, and grinders.

6.5B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with grinding and shaping tools.

6.5C    Uses safe operating practices with grinding and shaping tools.

6.5D    Inspects and maintains grinding and shaping tools.

6.6A    Selects the appropriate clamping tool, e.g., vises, pipe clamps, C-clamp s, hand-screw clamps, and web clamps.

6.6B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with clamping tools.

6.6C    Uses safe operating practices with clamping tools.

6.6D    Inspects and maintains clamping tools.

6.7A    Selects the appropriate pulling and lifting tool, e.g., jacks, come-alongs, and chain falls.

6.7B    Demonstrates eye-to-hand coordination and manual dexterity with pulling and lifting tools.

6.7C    Uses safe operating practices with pulling and lifting tools.

6.7D    Inspects and maintains pulling and lifting tools.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Drive 16-penny nails into framing lumber without bending or missing the nail.

·         Cut and assemble a simple section of a concrete form, using only hand tools. Verify square conditions, as appropriate.

·         Assemble threaded pipe (or conduit) and fittings, and properly tighten all joints.

·         Secure wood and metal for sawing and drilling operations using appropriate clamping tools.

·         Use a come-along to laterally move a heavy object across the floor.

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program, SkillsUSA, Communication and Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

STANDARD 7.0

 

Students will identify, select, inspect, safely use, maintain, and store power tools.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

7.1              Demonstrate the proper use of striking tools.

7.2       Demonstrate the proper use of cutting tools.

7.3       Demonstrate the proper use of torque producing tools.

7.4       Demonstrate the proper use of grinding and shaping tools.

7.5       Demonstrate the proper use of clamping tools.

7.6       Demonstrate the proper use of pulling and lifting tools.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

7.1A    Selects the appropriate striking tool, e.g., air hammers.

7.1B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with power striking tools.

7.1C    Uses safe operating practices with power striking tools.

7.1D    Inspects and maintains power striking tools.

7.2A    Selects the appropriate cutting tool, e.g., power saws, planers, routers, and drills.

7.2B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with power cutting tools.

7.2C    Uses safe operating practices with power cutting tools.

7.2D    Inspects and maintains power cutting tools.

7.2E    Makes precise cuts with power cutting tools.

7.2F     Sharpens power cutting tools, e.g., saw blades, planer knives, and drill bits.

7.3A    Selects the appropriate power torque-producing tool, e.g., power drivers and impact wrenches.

7.3B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with power torque-producing tools.

7.3C    Uses safe operating practices with power torque-producing tools.

7.3D    Inspects and maintains power torque-producing tools.

7.4A    Selects the appropriate power grinding and shaping tool, e.g., sanders and grinders.

7.4B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with power grinding and shaping tools.

7.4C    Uses safe operating practices with power grinding and shaping tools.

7.4D    Inspects and maintains power grinding and shaping tools.

7.5A    Selects the appropriate power-clamping tool, e.g., air clamps.

7.5B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with power clamping tools.

7.5C    Uses safe operating practices with power clamping tools.

7.5D    Inspects and maintains power clamping tools.

7.6A    Selects the appropriate power pulling and lifting tool, e.g., electric hoists and power jacks.

7.6B    Demonstrates eye/hand coordination and manual dexterity with power pulling and lifting tools.

7.6C    Uses safe operating practices with power pulling and lifting tools.

7.6D    Inspects and maintains power pulling and lifting tools.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Attach gypsum board to a wood frame wall using sheet rock screws, using a power driver.

·         Grind concrete surface using an electric grinder.

·         Drill holes for and install expanding anchor bolts into concrete using hammer drill and impact wrench.

·         Use air clamps to secure work pieces.

·         Use electric hoists to reposition heavy materials.

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program, SkillsUSA, Communication and Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

STANDARD 8.0

 

Students will make and lay out linear and angular measurements.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

8.1              Makes accurate linear measurements.

8.2       Makes accurate angular measurements.

8.3       Makes accurate two-dimensional layouts specified with linear and angular dimensions.

8.4       Makes accurate three-dimensional layouts specified with linear and angular dimensions.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

8.1A    Uses steel tape and square to lay out cuts in framing lumber to an accuracy of 1¤16 inch.

8.1B    Makes horizontal site layout measurements over 100 feet to an accuracy of 1¤8 inch using a steel tape and plumb bob.

8.1C    Measures dimensions of objects less than 1 foot to an accuracy of 1¤32 inch.

8.1D    Makes small linear measurements, such as wire diameter, to an accuracy of 0.001 inch.

8.2A    Makes angular measurements typical of framing to an accuracy of 1 degree, e.g., using a framing square or protractor.

8.2B    Makes angular measurements typical of site layout to an accuracy of 0.1 degree, e.g., using a builder’s level or transit.        

8.3A    Lays out locations of walls, windows, doors, and other structural elements specified in two dimensions.

8.3B    Lays out curvilinear boundaries, such as for driveways and patios specified in two dimensions.

8.4       Lays out site locations and elevations specified in three dimensions.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Construct batter boards and lay out a foundation plan based on a construction drawing, including grade stakes and locations of concrete forms, e.g., using stakes, hammers, steel tapes, and builder’s levels.

·         Measure all markings on a basketball (or other) court and verify that they meet regulations.

·         Given a loose set of assorted twist drill bits, measure and tag their diameters, and sort by size.

·         Lay out cuts on 2 ´ 4 or 2 ´ 6 lumber to make a regular octagon.

·         Lay out the corner locations for a hexagonal gazebo foundation.

·         Drill and tap a small piece of metal for a ¼” bolt

·         Cut and thread a piece of ½” or ¾” black iron pipe to specifications

·         Complete hands-on school-based projects involving one or more of the following: designing, sketching, cutting, measuring, assembling, and repairing school equipment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communication and Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

STANDARD 9.0

 

Students will transfer mathematics concepts to solve problems encountered in the construction industry.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

9.1       Apply geometric and algebraic concepts to calculations of areas and volumes from construction drawings.

9.2              Apply rate-of-change concepts to construction problems.

9.3       Estimate error propagation in calculations due to uncertainty in measurements.

9.4       Analyze the effect of interest rates on the cost of construction.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

9.1A    Calculates and estimates areas of irregular polygons and surfaces with complex curved boundaries from construction drawings, including such things as floors, walls, and roof surfaces.

9.1B    Calculates and estimates volumes of structural elements having regular and irregular geometric shapes, such as concrete required to construct slabs, columns, and beams.

9.1C    Estimates the number of unit material required from area and volume calculations, such as tiles and bricks.

9.2A    Calculates total rise and run from grade descriptions.

9.2B    Calculates the length of roof rafters from span and slope data.

9.2C    Calculates the grade given horizontal run and elevation change data, such as for a paved surface.

9.3A    Estimates the uncertainty in volume and area calculations, such as concrete required for a slab due to uncertainty in the grade under the slab.

9.3B    Determines which error in three given dimensions of a rectangular prism has the greatest effect on the volume of the prism.

9.4A    Estimates the impact of lost time on total cost of a construction loan, such as a delay due to bad weather.

9.4B    Calculates the interest cost of a construction loan at typical current rates, for a specified construction job.

9.4C    Compares a contractors cost-of-operating money for a given construction job on the basis of a pay-on-completion contract versus a specific draw-on-progress contract.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Make a material take-off for a single specialty area (e.g., framing, electrical, masonry, etc.) from data on construction drawings.

·         Calculate the volume of air in auditoriums, meeting rooms, sales, or work areas from data in construction drawings.

·         Estimate the maximum and minimum volume of concrete required for a ground level slab based on construction drawings and expected uncertainty in the grade of back fill.

·         Estimate the additional plaster material used if the plaster is 1¤8 inch thicker than specified in the construction drawings.

·         Estimate the cost of 20 days of lost construction time for a specified loan and specified list of fixed costs.

·         Estimate the volume of earth to be removed to dig a horizontal ditch in land with varying terrain elevation as specified in construction drawings.

·         Estimate the number of truckloads of fill material required to raise the elevation of a 250,000-ft² warehouse foundation by 5 ft.

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA Total Quality Curriculum, SkillsUSA, Communication and Writing Skills, Computer Science Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

STANDARD 10.0

 

Students will rig and move materials and equipment.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

10.1     Inspect rigging equipment.

10.2     Estimate size, weight, and center of gravity.

10.3     Demonstrate tying common knots used for rigging operations.

10.4     Evaluate various wire rope slings used for rigging operations.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

10.1A  Identifies and determines the use of each piece of rigging equipment.

10.1B Practices safe inspection of rigging equipment.

10.1C Passes with 100% accuracy a written examination relating specifically to rigging safety issues.

10.1D Passes with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating specifically to rigging.

10.1E Maintains a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

10.2A Explains and demonstrates the most accurate way to determine the size of an object.

10.2B Identifies and explains the center of gravity of an object.

10.2C Demonstrates finding the center of gravity of an object.

10.2D Explains and demonstrates ways to estimate the weight of an object.

10.3     Ties various knots used in rigging operations and tests for strength.

10.4     Identifies and explains various wire rope fittings and slings.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Determine size and weight of an object.

·         Determine the center of gravity of an object.

·         Practice tying various knots.

·         Attach rigging to a load.

·         Lift load and move to a new position.

·         Disconnect the rigging and store in proper place.

·         Practice rigging and moving materials and equipment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

Research and Writing Skills, Math, Math for Technology, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Precision Measurements, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Communication Skills, Teamwork and Leadership Skills, Language Arts, SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Knot Tying Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Department of Labor and Workforce Development, Labor Unions (AFL-CIO, IBEW), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Tennessee Occupational Safety and Health Administration (TOSHA)


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

STANDARD 11.0

 

Students will demonstrate proficiency in creating two and three dimensional scale drawings.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

11.1     Create accurate and complete manual scale drawings of two dimensional objects and two dimensional plans.

11.2     Apply drawing dimensioning rules using basic measurement systems.

11.3          Analyze the use of a computer-aided drafting software program to draw two and three dimensional objects.

11.4     Apply scaled dimensional drawing to a practical project.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

11.1A  Makes scale drawings of given two dimensional objects, including floor plans and equipment.

11.1B  Annotates drawings with labels and dimensions using basic manual lettering styles and techniques.

11.1C  Creates and completes title blocks on drawings.

11.2A  Applies dimensioning rules, such as avoiding redundancy and dimensioning to hidden lines, dual dimensions, and properly indicated tolerances.

11.2B  Uses basic measurement systems including fractions, decimals, English, and metric.

11.3          Compares the manual and electronic methods of preparing drawings.

11.4     Creates a simple dimensional drawing of a project to be completed as a project.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Complete a manual scale drawing of a classroom floor plan.

·         Complete a scale drawing of fire escape routes for each floor of school building.

·         Complete a manual drawing of custom-shaped metal/wooden blocks.

·         Complete a drawing of the teacher's desk.

·         Create a scale drawing of a floor plan of school auditorium using a CAD program.

·         Create a simple dimensional drawing of a small project to complete as a shop project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION/LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA, SkillsUSA Total Quality Curriculum, SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), Research and Writing Skills, Math, Math for Technology, Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Precision Measurements, Computer Science Skills, SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Foundation for Industrial Modernization (FIM), National Occupational Skill Standards for Computer-Aided Drafting and Design (CADD), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER)


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

STANDARD 12.0

 

Students will demonstrate job-seeking skills and exhibit employability characteristics required for employability and job retention in the workplace.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

Students will:

12.1     Plan a job search strategy.

12.2     Exhibit positive interview behavior.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

12.1A  Creates personal resumes in standard business format.

12.1B  Completes standard employment application forms.

12.2A  Models appropriate interview behavior.

12.2B  Generates appropriate responses to common interview questions.

12.2C  Selects appropriate attire for an employment interview.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

§                     Students create personal portfolios that include their resumes, sample job applications, prepared responses to common interview questions, and samples of work.

§                     Students participate in mock interviews with community business volunteers.

§                     Students work in small groups. Each group is given a real-world sample of an employee performance review document. Group members discuss the possible job behaviors that might have resulted in positive or negative results within the evaluation. Students also suggest strategies the employee can use to improve performance.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

National Council for Advanced Manufacturing NACFAM) and Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC), What Manufacturing Workers Need to Know and Be Able to Do: National Voluntary Skill Standards for Advanced High Performance Manufacturing; A Blueprint for Workforce Excellence;, International Technology Education Association, Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology; English, Communications, Sociology skills and content;. Professional Development Program, SkillsUSA; Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS); Ford Academy of Manufacturing Sciences (FAMS curriculum); Project Lead the Way curriculum


INTRO TO ELECTROMECHANICAL

 

 

SAMPLING OF AVAILABLE RESOURCES

 

 

Ø      Core Curriculum, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER),

Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ; ©2000. Also known as the “Wheels of Learning” materials.

 

Ø      Carpentry Core, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø      Introduction to Carpentry, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

 

Ø      Fundamentals of Construction, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø      Fundamentals of Carpentry, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø      Introduction to Plumbing, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø      Introduction to Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø      Introduction to Electricity, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø      Basic Drafting, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø      Print Reading for Construction, Walter C. Brown and Daniel P Dorfmueller, Goodheart-Willcox, © 2005

 

Ø      Foundations and Concrete Work, Editors of Fine Homebuilding, Taunton Press, Inc.,

December 2001.

 

Ø      Learning for Earnings, John A. Wanat, E. Weston Pfeiffer, and Richard Van Gulik, Goodheart-Willcox, © 2004

 

Ø      From School to Work, J. J. Littrell, Ed.D., James H. Lorenz, Ed.D., and Harry T. Smith, Ed.D., Goodheart-Willcox, © 2004

 

Ø      Constructor, The Construction Management Magazine, The Associated General Contractors of America

 

Ø      Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, www.state.tn.us/labor-wfd

 

Ø      Total Quality Curriculum, SkillsUSA, www.skillsusa.org

 

Ø      Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, www.skillsusa.org

 

Ø      National Association of Home Builders, www.nahb.org

 

Ø      United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, www.capenters.org

 

Ø      International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, www.ibew.org

 

Ø      National Association of Women in Construction, www.nawiceducation.org

 

Ø      Homebuilders Institute, www.hbi.org

 

Ø      United States Department of Labor, www.dol.gov

 

Ø      United States Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, www.dol.gov (link)

 

Ø      Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills, www.dol.gov (link)

 

Ø      Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), www.osha.gov

 

Ø      Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), www.epa.gov

 

Ø      National Safety Council, www.nsc.org

 

Ø      National Skills Standards Board Institute, www.nssb.org

 

Ø      Vocational Information Center, www.khake.com

 

Ø      Power Tool Institute (PTI), www.powertoolinstitute.com

 

Ø      Associated Builders and Contractors, www.abc.org

 

Ø      Associated General Contractors of America, www.agcofamerica.org

 

Ø       Building Officials and Code Administration International, www.bocai.org

 

Ø       American Red Cross, www.redcross.org  

 

Ø      Air Conditioning News, (BNP), www.bnpmedia.com

 

Ø      Air Conditioning Refrigeration Institute (ARI), www.ari.org

 

Ø      Refrigeration Service Engineers Society (RSES), www.rses.org

 

Ø       RSES Journal, RSES, www.rsesjournal.com

 

Ø       ACCA (Air-Conditioning Contractors Association), www.acca.org

 

Ø       American Concrete Institute International, http://www.aci-int.org/

 

Ø       National Concrete Masonry Association, www.ncma.org

 

Ø       International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE), www.iuoe.org

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Electromechanical I is a course in which students will learn and practice introductory skills related to operation and maintenance of electrical, instrumentation, and mechanical (electromechanical) systems found in a typical manufacturing facility.     Topics covered include: shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), electrical safety and the National Electric Code, conduit, conductor splicing/terminating, protection devices, DC, AC, grinding, reading electrical sketches, Process Instrument Diagrams and elementary drawings, transformers, AC/DC motors, basic temperature/ pressure/ level instruments, basic troubleshooting, and a laboratory experience for students for all of topics. This course gives students the basic skills and foundational knowledge needed to enter a post-secondary Electromechanical Associates Degree program and prepares students for an electromechanical career within a manufacturing facility.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is strongly recommended that administration and guidance follow the scope and sequence and course recommendations as listed.

 

Recommended                                               Construction Core, Algebra I or Technical Algebra (may be concurrent)

 

Recommended Credits:                                1

 

Recommended Grade Level(s):                   10th , 11th , 12th

 

Number of Competencies in Course:          65

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                            

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARDS

 

1.0       Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for

success in the school, community, and workplace.

 

2.0       Students will demonstrate the principles of safety and health procedures in the electrical   industry.

 

3.0      Students will evaluate career opportunities and career paths within the electromechanical industry.

 

4.0       Students will demonstrate interpersonal and employability skills required in the electromechanical industry.

 

5.0       Students will analyze and relate the risk when working with electrical systems and apply the National Electrical Code.

 

6.0       Students will set up a shield metal arc welder from a welding sketch or drawing, make single-pass fillet weld using a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process.

 

7.0       Students will safely store, operate, and maintain welding equipment and accessories.

 

8.0       Students will construct and explain the operation of direct current and alternating current circuits.

 

9.0       Students will demonstrate splicing, terminating, and insulating of conductors.

 

10.0     Students will analyze and install over-current protective devices, such as fuses and circuit

Breakers and demonstrate proper grounding according to NEC.

 

11. 0    Students will demonstrate basic troubleshooting techniques of a section of an   electromechanical system.

 

12.0     Students will analyze the theory of electric motors and install motors in accordance with industry requirements.

 

13.0     Students will interpret a basic Process Instrument Diagram (PID) and electrical elementary print.

 

14.0     Students will safely perform grinding operations.

 

15.0     Students will explain the operation of a basic single-phase transformer.

 

16.0     Students will check and calibrate basic instrumentation found on a typical industrial process.

17.0     Students will select and install common types of conduit and conductors in accordance with National Electrical Code (NEC) and local codes.

 


 

ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 1.0

 

Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

1.1       Demonstrate leadership skills.

1.2       Use problem-solving techniques to address and propose solutions to school, community, and workplace problems.

1.3       Demonstrate the ability to work professionally with others.

1.4       Participate in SkillsUSA as an integral part of instruction.

1.5       Exhibit integrity and pride in workmanship.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

1.1A    Uses critical-thinking and consensus building skills in-group deliberations.

1.1B    Keeps group work focused on task.

1.2A    Determines the root causes of observed conflicts or problems.

1.2B    Mediates disputes between parties.

1.3A    Participates in a job shadowing experience.

1.3B    Assembles a student team to solve an assigned problem.

1.4       Attends and participates in periodic meetings of SkillsUSA or similar organization.

1.5       Exhibits integrity and pride in workmanship.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Participate in various SkillsUSA or similar programs and/or competitive events.

  • Attend a professional organization meeting such as, local Chamber of Commerce meeting.

·         Participate in the American Spirit Award competition with SkillsUSA.

·         Participate in job shadowing or internship program with local business or industry.

·         Take an active role in a group project assigned by the instructor.

  • Identify and detail a problem area in the school, community, or workplace, and propose solutions. If possible, and with appropriate approvals, implement or facilitate the solution.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communications and

Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers, and Employment Agencies

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 2.0

 

Students will demonstrate the principles of safety and health procedures in the electrical industry.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS:

 

The student will:

2.1       Implement safety procedures established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA).

2.2       Analyze and categorize safety and health hazards and their prevention and treatment in

the electrical industry.

2.3       Determine safe and correct procedures for working with electricity.

2.4      Exhibit acceptable dress and personal grooming identified by the electrical industry.

2.5       Use protective clothing, eye protection, and safety equipment.

2.6      Demonstrate first aid practices.

2.7      Use fire protection equipment.

2.8      Comprehend the importance of a safe work environment.

2.9      Pass with 100% accuracy a written examination relating to safety issues.

2.10     Pass with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating to tools and equipment.

2.11     Maintains a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

2.1A    Establishes and maintains a safe and healthy working environment.

2.1B    Distinguishes and employs preventive measures of ecological, chemical, and physical

contaminants.

2.1C    Interprets information from a Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS).

2.1D    Comprehends their responsibilities, regulations, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) policies regarding reporting of accidents and observed hazards, and regarding emergency response procedures.

2.1E    Comprehends their responsibilities, regulations, and Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) policies to protect coworkers and bystanders from hazards.

2.2A    Differentiates between hazardous materials, substances, and waste.

2.2B    Retrieves MSDSs and identifies the health hazards associated with new materials.

2.2C    Reports hazards found on the job site to their supervisor.

2.2D    Maintains electrical equipment and laboratory in a safe and clean condition.

2.2E    Identify and explain Confined Spaces as per the Occupational Safety & Health                             Administration (OSHA) guidelines.

2.2F     Comprehends their responsibilities under HazCom regulations.

 

 

2.3A    Selects, inspects, and uses the correct instruments for working with electrical equipment and systems.

2.3B    Selects, inspects, and uses the correct personal protective equipment for working with                   electrical equipment and systems.

2.3C    Understand and explain the effects of voltage on the human body.

2.3D    Erects shields, barriers, and signage to protect coworkers and bystanders prior to starting potentially hazardous electrical tasks.

2.4A    Compares and contrasts acceptable dress and personal grooming for specific jobs in the

electrical industry.

2.4B    Understand the importance of personal hygiene and cleanliness in work and social                        environments.

2.5A    Selects, inspects, and uses the correct personal protective equipment for the assigned

task.

2.5B    Inspects, maintains, and employs safe operating procedures with tools and equipment,                   such as hand and power tools, ladders, and lifting equipment.

2.6       Administers simulated basic first aid procedures including treating burns and cuts and

electrical shock.

2.7A    Identify the components of fire.

2.7B    Identify the four types of fire extinguishers.

2.7C    Explain the proper use of each class of fire extinguisher.

2.7D    Explain the PASS method (Pull, Aim, Squeeze, and Sweep)

2.8A    Continuously is aware of potential hazards to themselves and others.

2.8B    Provides and activates adequate ventilation equipment as required by the task.

2.8C    Researches the effects of substance abuse on performance.

2.8D    Operates and maintains tools in accordance with manufacturer’s instructions and as

required by regulation or Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) policy.

2.9      Passes with 100% accuracy a written examination relating specifically to electrical safety issues.

2.10     Passes with 100% accuracy a performance examination relating specifically to electrical tools and equipment.

2.11     Maintains a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Conduct a safety and health inspection and identify any potential hazards.

·         List causes of most common accidents and outlines a safety prevention program.

·         Participate in the Occupational Health and Safety competitions with SkillsUSA.

·         Outline a safety management program.

·         Develop emergency policies for the electrical laboratory or classroom.

  • Role-play proper procedure for treating burns, cuts, electrical shock treatments according to standards set forth by the American Red Cross.

·         Obtain an American Red Cross First Aid Certification and/or CPR Certification.

·         Select fire extinguishers for the proper application.

·         Demonstrate the PASS method of fire extinguisher use.

·         Select, inspect, and use the correct personal protective equipment for the assigned task.

·         Inspect power tools for intact guards, shields, insulation, and other protective devices.

·         Inspect extension cords for the presence of a functional ground connection, prior to use.

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Math, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication

Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary

Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated

General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 3.0

 

Students will evaluate career opportunities and career paths within the electromechanical industry.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

3.1       Explain titles, roles, and functions of individuals in the electrical industry.

3.2       Investigate employment and entrepreneurial opportunities in the electrical industry.

3.3       Evaluate personal characteristics required for working in the electrical industry.

3.4       Investigate post-secondary education, professional organizations, and trade publications

appropriate for continuing education.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

3.1A    Researches occupations within the electrical industry.

3.1B    Categorizes major responsibilities for each occupation in the electrical industry.

3.2       Researches and develops a projection of industry trends related to career opportunities in the electrical industry.

3.3       Profiles personal characteristics that are beneficial to the success of a professional in the electrical industry.

3.4A    Investigates career options and charts the characteristics of various careers in the                electrical industry.

3.4B    Researches, sets up and maintain a file outlining professional organizations, current                        issues, future trends, and emerging technologies in the electrical industry.

3.4C    Researches and locates information on post secondary schools that offer electrical                         training.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Categorize employment and entrepreneurial opportunities (listing salary).

·         Develop a profile of career opportunities, education requirements, and projected future

employment.

·         Develop a personal career plan.

·         Appraise professional heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration industry

organizations and explain their purposes.

·         Incorporate professional terminology into conversation.

·         Attend meetings of a related professional trade organization.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Science, Math, Computer Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 4.0

 

Students will demonstrate interpersonal and employability skills required in the electromechanical industry.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

4.1       Infer relationships between work ethics and organizational and personal job success.

4.2      Demonstrate attitudes conducive to workplace success.

4.3       Maintain a neat and orderly work area.

4.4       Assess implications of diversity for communities and workplaces.

4.5      Exhibit positive employability behaviors.

4.6       Develop individual time management and work sequencing skills.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

4.1A    Illustrates the concept of a “work ethic.”

4.1B    Assesses the potential impact of an individual’s work ethic on an organizational system.

4.1C    Infers the relationship between work ethics and personal job success.

4.2A    Judges which attitudes are conducive to success.

4.2B    Modifies behavior to reflect attitudes for success.

4.3A    Keeps work area organized and free from clutter.

4.3B    Cleans work area according to shop standard.

4.3C    Deduces the correlation between a clean orderly work environment and successful and

efficient job performance.

4.4A    Points out benefits and problems that may arise from diversity in the transportation

service workplace.

4.4B    Devises solutions to problems arising from diversity.

4.5A    Demonstrates proper dress for work in electrical industry.

4.5B    Demonstrates appropriate grooming for work in electrical industry.

4.6A    Assesses the benefits of incorporating time management principles into work in the

electrical industry.

4.6B    Displays time management and work sequencing skills in class assignments.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Explain hazards associated with improper dress.

·         Explain the importance of arriving at work at the assigned time.

·         Explain the importance of honesty and integrity in the workplace.

·         Explain multi cultural environments and there importance in the workplace.

 

 

 

 

 

  • Research cultural diversity and equity issues impacting the electrical industry.
  • Students are divided into groups of four to six. Each group is given a different scenario of an electrical industry service workplace situation in which an employee demonstrates a poor work ethic. The group identifies the problem and all the possible ramifications of the individual’s behavior for the organization, other employees, and the employee him/herself. Each group then presents its scenario and analysis to the class.

·         Explain the importance of community involvement by companies and employees.

·         Maintain a clean and safe working environment in all shop and class activities.

·         Demonstrate proper time management in assigned activities.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Math, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication

Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary

Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 5.0

 

Students will analyze and relate the risk when working with electrical systems and apply the National Electrical Code.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

5.1      Evaluate the potential risk of injury from electrical shock, burns, and arc blasts.

5.2       Research various types, applications, and care of protective equipment for electrical

workers.

5.3       Practice industry and company safety policies and standards.

5.4      Evaluate the potential risk of injury from non-electrical risks.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

5.1A    Demonstrates methods to prevent injury from electrical shock.

5.1B    Demonstrates methods to prevent injury from electrical burns.

5.1C    Demonstrates methods to prevent injury from arc blasts.

5.2A    Selects, inspects, and uses personal protective equipment, such as rubber gloves, and

head, eye, and face protection.

5.2B    Selects and uses special tools, such as hot sticks and shorting probes.

5.3A    Identifies possible risks and completes reports of safety violations.

5.3B    Complies with applicable safety policies and standards.

5.3C    Demonstrates de-energizing the circuit.

5.3D    Completes lockout/tagout procedures.

5.3E    Reports safety hazards to supervisors and safety personnel.

5.4A    Explains the potential risk of injury from falls and falling objects, and the recommended risk mitigation procedures.

5.4B    Explains the potential risk of injury from confined space entry, and the recommended risk mitigation procedures.

5.4C    Explains the potential risk of injury from respiratory hazards, and the recommended risk mitigation procedures.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Students will assess risk factors, address safety policies and standards (using National Electric Code) to the instructor’s satisfaction, for tasks such as those described below, and then execute the task (real or simulated).
  • Replace a 20A circuit breaker in a 277V lighting sub panel, where activity in the building precludes de-energizing the entire sub panel.
  • Tighten a loose through-bolt on a one-barrel fixed-tongue compression connector used to connect a 500-KCMIL wire to a 12V, 2000A electroplating power supply.

 

 

  • Change ballast on a 277V, four-tube, ceiling-mounted, fluorescent lighting fixture mounted 18 feet above the floor.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Math, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication

Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Skills USA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


BASIC PRINCIPLES OF WELDING

 

STANDARD 6.0

 

Students will make single-and multiple-pass fillet and groove welds using a shielded, metal arc welding (SMAW) process.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

6.1       Make single-pass fillet and groove welds in the flat position.

6.2       Make single-pass fillet and groove welds in the horizontal position.

6.3       Make single-pass fillet and groove in the vertical position.

6.4       Make single-pass fillet and groove welds in the overhead position.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

6.1A    Makes a single-pass fillet weld and a groove weld on plain carbon steel in the flat position.

6.2A    Makes a single-pass fillet weld and a groove weld on plain carbon steel in the horizontal position.

6.3A    Makes a single-pass fillet weld and a groove weld on plain carbon steel in a vertical position.

6.4A    Makes a single-pass fillet weld and a groove weld on plain carbon steel in an overhead

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

·         Complete projects to enhance the learning activity. Integrate related academic skills and knowledge to design, layout, and fabricate a welding project.

·         Practice for the Entry-Level Welder Certification.

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Language Arts, Mathematics, Technical Algebra, Technical Geometry, Algebra, Geometry English IV: Communication for Life, SkillsUSA Technical Championships, American Welding Society (AWS), Guide for Training and Qualification of Entry Level Welder, National Center for Construction Education Research (NCCER), Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Professional Development Program, SkillsUSA


ELECTROMECHANCIAL I

 

 

STANDARD 7.0

 

Students will safely store, operate, and maintain welding equipment and accessories.

 

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

7.1       Implement and comply with ANSI Z49.1, Safety and Welding, Cutting, and Allied

Processes and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements for operating each piece of equipment.

7.2       Demonstrate required safety practices while operating all equipment and tools.

7.3       Exhibit acceptable dress and personal grooming as identified by the welding industry.

7.4       Demonstrate the use of basic metal working and welding equipment.

7.5       Evaluate the importance and use of ventilation.

7.6       Properly handle welding gas cylinders.

 

PERFORMANCE INDICATORS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

7.1A    Passes with 100% accuracy a written safety examination relating to the applicable sections of ANSI Z49.1, Safety and Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements.

7.1B    Demonstrates compliance with ANSIZ49.1 as it relates to protection of personnel in the general area, ventilation, fire prevention and protection, precautionary information, and

general aspects.

7.1C    Establishes and maintains a working environment incorporating the principles of ANSI Z49.1, Safety and Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes.

7.1D    Analyzes fire prevention, electrical and safety methods to be incorporated with the use of welding equipment.

7.1E    Completes a safety inspection introducing Hazcom confined space and lockout/tagout implications.

7.2A    Maintain a portfolio record of equipment for which the student has passed an examination covering the operation of welding equipment and tools.

7.2B    Maintain a portfolio record of equipment for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

7.3A    Compares and contrasts appropriate and inappropriate dress and personal grooming characteristics for specific jobs in the welding industry.

7.3B    Uses appropriate dress, eye/face protection, gloves, and other protective devices as required by ANSI Z49.1, Safety and Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes.

7.4       Demonstrates grinding, sawing, and drilling operations within the tolerance specified on a drawing or blueprint.

7.5A    Uses ventilating equipment, safety shields, and curtains as required by ANSI Z49.1, Safety and Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes.

7.5B    Develops and administers formative or diagnostic tests for proper ventilation.


7.6A    Stores welding gas cylinders in an upright and secure position.

7.6B    Operates with welding gas cylinders in an upright and secured position.

7.6C    Installs cylinder caps immediately upon removal of gauges from welding gas cylinders.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

·         Write a report on potential skin and eye damage caused by ultraviolet radiation produced by arc welding processes.

·         Participate in a job interview where a portfolio is used to show welding equipment and tools that the student has received an operational checkout by the instructor and grades on written examinations of the operation of welding equipment and tools

·         Look up MSDS for welding fluxes, shielding compounds, and filler materials to assess the risks of toxic gas release and acidity in the school welding shop.

·         Demonstrate the proper handling and transportation of compressed gas cylinders.

·         Simulate use of fire extinguisher.

·         Appraise the work area for safety hazards and list common causes of typical accidentsand injuries in the welding industry. Based on the findings of the appraisal, outline a safety corrections program and present the program to the school and professional organizations.

·         Cut, saw, and drill holes in metal.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Language Arts, Mathematics, Technical Algebra, Technical Geometry, English IV: Communication for Life, Algebra, Geometry, SkillsUSA Technical Championships, American Welding Society (AWS), Guide for Training and Qualification of Entry Level Welder, National Center for Construction Education Research (NCCER), Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Professional Development Program, SkillsUSA

 

 


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 8.0

 

Students will construct and explain the operation of direct current and alternating current circuits.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

8.1       Analyze the basic characteristics of direct current and alternating electricity.

8.2      Apply Ohm’s law to electrical and systems.

8.3       Examine electrical circuits and components.

8.4      Apply basic control wiring and wiring processes used in the electrical industry.

8.5       Determine the role of electron flow as it related to electricity.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

8.1A    Correlates basic electrical concepts with electrical function.

8.1B    Illustrates the concepts of valence, voltage, current, resistance, and voltage drop.

8.1C    Compares the two theories of current flow and indicates which theory(s) are used in

electrical systems.

8.1D    Distinguishes between conductor, insulator, and semi-conductor

8.1E    Distinguishes between DC (direct current) and AC (alternating current).

8.2A    Deduces the cause and effect relationship in Ohm’s law between voltages, current,

resistance, and voltage drop.

8.2B    Uses Ohm’s law to determine values mathematically.

8.3A    Analyzes series circuit structure both in application and mathematically.

8.3B    Analyzes parallel circuit structure both in application and mathematically.

8.3C    Analyzes series-parallel circuit structure both in application and mathematically.

8.3D    Differentiates between a short and a ground.

8.3E    Compares magnetism and electromagnetism.

8.4A   Wire and test different devices used in the electrical industry.

8.4B    Wire and test different control circuits and systems used in the electrical industry.

8.5A    Illustrates electron induction and flow.

8.5B    Compares concepts of magnetism to their electrical counterparts: reluctance to resistance, field distance to voltage, and magnetic force to current.

8.5C    Analyzes the role of magnetism and electromagnetic induction in electrical systems.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Use appropriate instruments and meters to measure watts, volts, Ohms, and amps.

·         Select appropriate meter to check amps, voltage, watts, and ohms.

·         Demonstrate the proper use of an ammeter, ohmmeter, voltmeter, and wattmeter

·         Construct series and parallel circuits.

·         Select proper fuse or breaker for a given size wire.

·         Determine the capacities of a given run capacitor.

·         Wire and test electrical switches and devices used in a typical system or job.

·         Identify the different types of electrical switches and components by rating and appearance.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Math, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), Skills USA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 9.0

 

Students will demonstrate splicing, terminating, and insulating of conductors.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

9.1       Research National Electrical Code (NEC) and local code requirements for splicing,

terminating, and insulating of conductors.

9.2       Demonstrate splicing, terminating, and insulating of conductors.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

9.1A    Evaluates common wire nuts for making connections and explains when and how to use.

9.1B    Explains which crimp-on wire lugs or mechanical compression connectors are acceptable in various situations.

9.1C    Analyzes special considerations for making splices and connections to aluminum

conductors.

9.1D    Evaluates insulation systems applicable to common splices and terminations.

9.2A    Completes multiple wire connections using proper size wire nuts.

9.2B    Demonstrates wire terminations and splices using proper crimp-on wire lugs and

mechanical compression connectors.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Complete wiring for residential service or mockup.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Math, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication

Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary

Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 10.0

 

Students will analyze and install over-current protective devices, such as fuses and circuit

Breakers and demonstrate proper grounding according to NEC.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

10.1     Compare the characteristics and uses of fuses and circuit breakers.

10.2     Identify physical examples of fuses and circuit breakers.

10.3     Demonstrate the installation, wiring, testing, and operation of fuses and breakers in both single and three-phase circuits.

10.4     Utilize effective grounding practices, as prescribed by the National Electrical Code

(NEC) and local code

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

10.1     Justifies a specific choice of fuse or circuit breaker for over-current protection.

10.2A Determines characteristics of a fuse needing replacement based on markings printed on

the fuse.

10.2B Classifies a circuit breaker by its voltage, current, and interrupting-capacity ratings by

physical observation or reference to technical manuals.

10.3A Installs, connects, and tests fuses.

10.3B Installs, connects, and tests circuit breakers.

10.4A  Demonstrates connection of ground wires and installation of bonding straps

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Install and test breakers for residential service or mockup.

·         Remove, tests for continuity, and reinstall fuses in three-phase disconnect switches.

  • Determine required ground wire for industrial service or mockup.

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Applied Communication, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, NCCER, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers

 


ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

STANDARD 11.0

 

Students will demonstrate basic troubleshooting techniques of a section of an electromechanical system.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

11.1     Troubleshoot a small section of an electromechanical system.

 

 

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

11.1     Given blueprints of a typical electromechanical system and after confirming the correct operation of an operational section of an electromechanical system will systematically and logically troubleshoot, within a given amount of time, the system after the instructor has put in a problem.

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion

  • Instructor sets up an operational electromechanical system (motor driving a pump with a coupling, an instrumentation loop, etc.) and ensures the students understands the sectioni of the system. The instructor then puts a problem in the system and takes the role of an operator and tells the student of the symptoms of the problem in the section. The student then begins to diagnose/troubleshoot the system.       The student is given a definite amount of time to systematically and logically troubleshoot the problem.

 

 

 

 

.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Math, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication

Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 


ELECTRICAL II

 

STANDARD 12.0

 

Students will analyze the theory of electric motors and install motors in accordance with industry requirements.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

12.1     Select and identify a motor based on its intended use.

12.2     Determine the installation requirements to satisfy National Electrical Code (NEC) and

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, given a motor and specified application.

12.3     Select, install, and wire DC, single-phase, and three phase-electric motors.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

12.1A Given an application, determines the size, speed, operating voltage, and National

Electrical Manufacturing Association (NEMA) type for the required motor.

12.1B Identifies and properly selects a motor based upon the intended use and National

Electrical Manufacturing Association (NEMA) enclosure classification.

12.2     Determines the required over-current protection, motor control circuits, conductor types and sizes, and conduit types and sizes, as required by National Electric Code (NEC), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations and described by installation drawings for a given motor and application.

12.3A Comprehends basic operation of DC motors and common, single phase AC motors, and three-phase induction motors.

12.3B Distinguishes between and contrast the operating characteristics of series and shunt DC

motors.

12.3C Contrasts and compares starting procedures and circuits for split-phase induction motors and capacitor-type induction motors.

12.3D Selects, installs, and properly wires three-phase induction motors with the necessary

motor contactors, overload protection, and control switches.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given an application requiring a DC motor (other than a permanent magnet motor), select, install, and wire the motor in accordance with installation needs and NEC and OSHA requirements.
  • Given an application requiring a single-phase capacitor motor, select, install, and wire the motor in accordance with installation needs and NEC and OSHA requirements.

·         Given an application requiring a reversing three-phase motor, select, install, and wire the motor in accordance with installation needs and NEC and OSHA requirements.

 

 
 
INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communications and

Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers, and Employment Agencies

 


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 13.0

 

Students will interpret a basic Process Instrument Diagram (PID) and electrical elementary print.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

13.1     Interpret the field devices shown on a basic Process Instrument Diagram (PID).

13.2       Interpret the field devices shown on a basic electrical elementary print.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student will:

13.1A Correctly associate/identify all field device symbols and equipment symbols shown on a PID to the actual field devices of a process loop and explain the basic process operation of the devices and equipment shown in the process loop.

13.1B Correctly associate/identify all electrical symbols shown on an electrical elementary print to the actual field devices of a control loop and explain the basic electrical operation.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given an a PID and a basic instrumentation control loop, the student will associate the parts of the loop in the field to the instruments and field devices shown on the PID.
  • Given an electrical elementary print and a basic electrical control system/circuit, the student explain the flow of electrical current through the system and explain the basic operation the system/circuit performs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communications and

Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers, and Employment Agencies

 


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 14.0

 

Students will safely perform grinding operations.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

14.1     Safely and correctly grind a piece of metal using various types of grinders.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

14.1A Safety and correctly perform a grinding operation (cutting, smoothing, and deburring) on metal using a hand-held grinder.

14.1B Safety and correctly perform a grinding operation (cutting, smoothing, and deburring) on metal using a pedestal bench grinder.

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given a piece of metal, students will perform a smoothing and deburring operation using a pedestal bench grinder.
  • Given a piece of metal, students will perform a smoothing and deburring operation using a hand-held grinder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communications and

Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers, and Employment Agencies


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 15.0

 

Students will explain the operation of a basic single-phase transformer.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

15.1     Demonstrate their understanding of the operation of a single-phase step-up, step-down, isolating, and current transformer.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

15.1A Will confirm the correct operation of a single-phase step-up transformer.

15.1B Will confirm the correct operation of a single-phase step-down transformer.

15.2A Will confirm the correct operation of a single-phase isolation transformer.

15.2B Will confirm the correct operation of a single-phase current transformer.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given an operating transformer, the student will be directed by the instructor to connect a single-phase transformer for specific primary and secondary parameters.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communications and

Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers, and Employment Agencies

 


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 16.0

 

Students will check and calibrate basic instrumentation found on a typical industrial process.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

16.1     Check and calibrate basic pressure, temperature, flow, and level instrumentation.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

16.1A Will check and calibrate (+/- 1% tolerance) a basic pressure transmitter.

16.1B Will check and calibrate (+/- 1% tolerance) a basic temperature transmitter.

16.2A Will check and calibrate (+/- 1% tolerance) a basic flow transmitter.

16.2B Will check and calibrate (+/- 1% tolerance) a basic level transmitter.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given an operational instrument (pressure, temperature, flow, or level) and a calibration range, the student confirm the instrument is operational, confirm what the instrument’s current calibration range is, and calibrate the instrument to a new specific range calibration (within +/- 1%).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communications and

Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers, and Employment Agencies


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

STANDARD 17.0

 

Students will select and install common types of conduit and conductors in accordance with National Electrical Code (NEC) and local codes.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

17.1     Select type and size of conduit for given electrical installations in accordance with

National Electrical Code (NEC) and local codes.

17.2    Select type and size of conductors for a given electrical installation in accordance with                  the National Electrical Code (NEC) and local codes.

17.3     Physically identify conductors and cables by accepted industry designation and suitability under National Electrical Code (NEC).

17.4     Connect conductors according to National Electrical Code (NEC) and local codes.

17.5     Demonstrate electrical installations with electrical metal tubing (EMT) and polyvinyl

chloride (PVC) conduit.

17.6     Demonstrate electrical installations with intermediate metal conduit (IMC) and rigid        

conduit.

17.7    Plan and set up a cable pull through assorted conduit and cable trays configurations.

17.8     Pull conductors into conduits and raceways.

17.9    Compare manual and power fish-tape or cable-puller systems.

17.10   Demonstrate cable pull through assorted conduit configurations.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

17.1A Explains choices for type and size of conduit to comply with National Electrical Code

(NEC) and local codes.

17.1B Selects fittings and boxes which meet installation and code requirements.

17.1C Determines the spacing of clamps and supporting devices for conduit and cables.

17.2A Determines allowable current in a specified conductor.

17.2B Determines the maximum number and sizes of conductors in a conduit of given

dimensions.

17.3A Categorizes conductors and cables based upon wires size and gauge, insulation and jacket types, and voltage ratings.

17.3B Reads and identifies markings on conductors and cables.

17.3C Uses tables in National Electrical Code (NEC) to determine current capacity of a

conductor.

17.4     Adheres to National Electrical Code (NEC) requirements for color codes for grounded

conductors and “high-leg” conductors.

17.5A Demonstrates stub, offset, saddle, and parallel bends with electrical metal tubing (EMT) conduit.

17.5B Demonstrates stub, offset, saddle, and parallel bends with polyvinyl chloride (PVC)

conduit.

17.5C Cuts and reams electrical metal tubing (EMT) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) conduit.

17.5D Installs and secures electrical metal tubing (EMT) and plastic conduit with clamps and

fittings conforming to National Electrical Code (NEC) and local code.

17.6A Demonstrates stub, offset, saddle, and parallel bends with intermediate metal conduit

(IMC) and rigid conduit.

17.6B Cuts, reams, and threads intermediate metal conduit (IMC) and rigid conduit.

17.6C Installs and secures intermediate metal conduit (IMC) and rigid conduit with clamps and fittings conforming to National Electrical Code (NEC) and local code.

17.7A Selects proper locations to start and end a conductor pull.

17.7B Uses mandrel, swabs, and brushes to prepare conduit for conductors.

17.7C Sets up conductor reels to assure proper feed during the pull.

17.8     Demonstrates the ability to pull conductors into conduits and raceways.

17.9A Installs manual and power fish-tape or cable-puller systems.

17.9B Attaches conductors to manual and power fish-tape or cable-puller systems.

17.10A Completes a cable pull through assorted conduit and pull-box configurations.

17.10B Calculates allowable pulling tension for a specified group of conductors.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given a proposed addition to a commercial electrical system, determine the type and size of conduit required to conform to National Electrical Code (NEC) and local code.
  • Make stub bends to a specified height, offset bends to a specified depth and angle, and saddle bends to clear a specified obstacle. Repeats performance until industry standards are met.
  • Given a starting and termination point, determine an optimum route to minimize the bends required for a conduit run.

·         Given termination points and obstacles, determine an optimum route, make bends and cuts, install, and secure the conduit with proper clamps.

  • Select and use proper switches in lighting and motor control circuits in residential and

commercial mockups.

·         Install permanent labels as required on disconnect devices in residential and commercial mockups.

  • Given a floor plan for a single-family residence, determine type and location of switches and receptacles, as reasonable for use and required by NEC.

·         For the residential project above, create a switch and receptacle bill of materials

  • Produce a 32 ft2 or larger mockup of a three-phase commercial electrical installation,

including a service and three subsystems. Project steps (also relevant to other standards) should include blueprint of the mockup, bill of materials, simulated electrical inspections, completion of wiring, and functional testing.

  • Participate in a class field trip to local commercial or industrial operating facility to view examples of large scale conduit, raceways, cable trays, and so forth.

·         Repeat all performance tasks until industry standards are met including time standard.

·         For commercial and residential mockups, select and install proper conductors and cables in conduit. Repeat performance task until industry standards and time factor is achieved.

  • Pull multiple conductors through conduit runs in residential and commercial mockups.

Repeat performance until industry standard is met including time factor.

·         For a given group of conductors, calculate the allowable pulling tension.

  • Given the size and number of conductors required in an underground conduit to a separate paint-shop building, determine the minimum conduit diameter.
  • Install a specified run of electrical metal tubing (EMT) conduit on a masonry wall using the proper spacing of clamps and supports.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Math, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication

Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary

Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development


ELECTROMECHANICAL I

 

SAMPLING OF AVAILABLE RESOURCES

 

Ø      Core Curriculum, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Welding Level One, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Electrical Level One, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Electrical Level Two, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Electrical Level Three, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Electrical Level Four, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Residential Electrical I, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Residential Electrical II, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø       Total Quality Curriculum, National SkillsUSA

 

Ø       Professional Development Program, National SkillsUSA—www.skillsusa.org

 

Ø       Power Tool Institute, www.powertoolinstitute.com

 

Ø      Fluke Educators Portal, http://support.fluke.com/educators

 

Ø      National Association of Home Builders, www.nahb.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ø      International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, www.ibew.org

 

Ø      National Association of Women in Construction, www.nawiceducation.org

 

Ø      Homebuilders Institute, www.hbi.org

 

Ø      United States Department of Labor, www.dol.gov

 

Ø      United States Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, www.dol.gov (link)

 

Ø      Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills, www.dol.gov (link)

 

Ø      Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), www.osha.gov

 

Ø      Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), www.epa.gov

 

Ø      National Safety Council, www.nsc.org

 

Ø      National Skills Standards Board Institute, www.nssb.org

 

Ø      Vocational Information Center, www.khake.com

 

Ø      Power Tool Institute (PTI), www.powertoolinstitute.com

 

Ø      Associated Builders and Contractors, www.abc.org

 

Ø      Associated General Contractors of America, www.agcofamerica.org

 

Ø      Building Officials and Code Administration International, www.bocai.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

 

Electromechanical II is a course in which students will learn and practice intermediate skills related to operation and maintenance of electrical, instrumentation, and mechanical (electromechanical) systems found in a typical manufacturing facility. Topics covered include basic mig (metal inert gas) welding, mechanical transmission, piping and auxiliaries, basic hydraulics, basic digital electronics, advanced troubleshooting, smart instrumentation, basic programmable logic controller operation, intro to gear, centrifugal, positive displacement pumps, and a laboratory experience for students for all of topics. This course gives students the intermediate skills and knowledge needed to enter a post-secondary Electromechanical Associates Degree program and prepares students for an electromechanical career within a manufacturing facility.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is strongly recommended that administration and guidance follow the scope and sequence and course recommendations as listed.

 

Recommended:                                              Construction Core, Electrical I, Algebra I or Technology Algebra, Principles of Technology I or Physical Science, Geometry, Technical Geometry       

 

Recommended Credits:                                1

 

Recommended Grade Level(s):                   11TH and 12th

 

Number of Competencies in Course:          32

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

STANDARDS

 

1.0       Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for

success in the school, community, and workplace.

 

2.0       Students will assume responsibility for the safety of themselves, their coworkers, and                    bystanders.

 

3.0      Students will set up a mig (metal inert gas) welder for proper operation and perform the five basic types of welds: lap joint, butt joint, corner joint, edge joint and T-joint.

 

4.0       Students will set up a typical mechanical drive system (gear and belt drive) found in an industrial setting.

 

5.0       Students will perform basic piping and auxiliaries (including bolted flange, screw pipe, etc.) found in a typical industrial setting.

 

6.0       Students will explain the theory, component operation, and fluid power in a basic industrial hydraulics system.

 

7.0       Students will construct and test fundamental basic digital logic circuits (gates, counters, oscillators, and switches).

 

8.0       Students will demonstrate advanced troubleshooting techniques.

 

9.0      Students will setup, identify instrument parameters, and change instrument calibration           of smart instrumentation using the proper communicator.

 

10.0     Students will explain the operation of a basic programmable logic controller.

 

11.0     Students will explain the basic operation of gear, centrifugal, and positive displacement pumps typically found in industrial settings.

 


 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

STANDARD 1.0

 

Students will demonstrate leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success in the school, community, and workplace.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

1.1       Demonstrate leadership skills.

1.2       Use problem-solving techniques to address and propose solutions to school, community, and workplace problems.

1.3       Demonstrate the ability to work professionally with others.

1.4       Participate in SkillsUSA as an integral part of instruction.

1.5       Exhibit integrity and pride in workmanship.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

1.1A    Uses critical-thinking and consensus building skills in-group deliberations.

1.1B    Keeps group work focused on task.

1.2A    Determines the root causes of observed conflicts or problems.

1.2B    Mediates disputes between parties.

1.3A    Participates in a job shadowing experience.

1.3B    Assembles a student team to solve an assigned problem.

1.4       Attends and participates in periodic meetings of SkillsUSA or similar organization.

1.5       Exhibits integrity and pride in workmanship.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Participate in various SkillsUSA or similar programs and/or competitive events.

  • Attend a professional organization meeting such as, local Chamber of Commerce meeting.

·         Participate in the American Spirit Award competition with SkillsUSA.

·         Participate in job shadowing or internship program with local business or industry.

·         Take an active role in a group project assigned by the instructor.

  • Identify and detail a problem area in the school, community, or workplace, and propose solutions. If possible, and with appropriate approvals, implement or facilitate the solution.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

SkillsUSA Professional Development Program (PDP), SkillsUSA, Communications and

Writing Skills, Teambuilding Skills, Research, Language Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Algebra, Geometry, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Social Studies, Problem Solving, Interpersonal Skills, Employability Skills, Critical-Thinking Skills, Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), SCANS (Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills), Chamber of Commerce, Colleges, Universities, Technology Centers, and Employment Agencies

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

STANDARD 2.0

 

Students will assume responsibility for the safety of themselves, their coworkers, and bystanders.

.

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

2.1       Exhibit and encourage in others a positive attitude regarding safety practices and issues.

2.2       Habitually inspect and use appropriate personal protective equipment for assigned tasks.

2.3       Inspect, maintain, and employ safe operating procedures with tools and equipment, such as scaffolding, lifting equipment, and air-powered drivers.

2.4       Exhibit a well-developed awareness of potential hazards to self and others.

2.5       Carry out responsibilities under HazCom (Hazard Communication) regulations.

2.6       Take action to protect coworkers and bystanders from hazards as required by regulations and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) policies.

2.7       Report accidents and observed hazards and execute emergency response procedures as

required by regulations and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) policies.

2.8       Demonstrate appropriate industrial-related safety procedures.

2.9       Pass with 100 % accuracy a written examination relating specifically to electromechanical safety issues

2.10    Maintain a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations

for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

2.1A    Includes safety procedures in activity plans.

2.1B    Exhibits an awareness of proper safety procedures by coworkers.

2.1C    Responds positively to instruction, advice, and correction regarding safety issues.

2.1D    Reports to school or work physically ready to perform to professional standards, such as, rested or not impaired by medications, drugs, alcohol, and so forth.

2.2       Selects, inspects, and uses the correct personal protective equipment for the assigned                     task.

2.3A    Checks scaffolding for stability, bracing, walk boards, and guard rails prior to use.

2.3B    Inspects extension cords for the presence of a functional ground connection, prior to use.

2.4A    Is observant of personnel and activities in the vicinity of the work area.

2.4B    Warns nearby personnel, prior to starting potentially hazardous actions

2.5A    Applies information from material safety data sheet (MSDS) to protect self and others

from the health hazards associated with assigned tasks.

2.5B    Reports hazards found on the job site to the supervisor and remedies the hazard as                       instructed.

2.6A    Warns and protects workers and bystanders of overhead loads in transit.

2.6B    Provides and activates adequate ventilation equipment as required by the task.

2.7A    Reports all injuries and observed unguarded hazards to the immediate supervisor.

2.7B    Executes assigned tasks as described in emergency response procedures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.8A    Is observant of safety issues and concerns relevant to the construction industry

2.8B    Complies with all safety guidelines and regulations set forth by industry and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

2.9       Passes with 100 % accuracy a written examination relating specifically to electromechanical issues.

2.10     Maintains a portfolio record of written safety examinations and equipment examinations for which the student has passed an operational checkout by the instructor.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Prior to assigning a task using power tools, the instructor removes some required safety items and instructs students to perform an inspection of tools.

  • Instruct a visitor to obviously approach the vicinity of a student conducting a hazardous

activity and note the level of awareness demonstrated by the student.

  • In a project requiring solvents or adhesives, introduce a new brand or type and require

students to retrieve the MSDS and identify possible health hazards.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW)

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

STANDARD 3.0

 

Students will set up a mig (metal inert gas) welder for proper operation and perform the five basic types of welds: lap joint, butt joint, corner joint, edge joint and T-joint.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

3.1       Interpret dimensions and specifications on a welding sketch, correctly set up a mig welder, safely perform a lap joint, butt joint, corner joint, edge joint, and t-joint weld.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

3.1A    correctly sets up the mig welder for a lap joint, butt joint, corner joint, edge joint, and t-joint weld.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

This is sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

·         Given a set of specifications for a weld and a specific type of metal, make a lap joint, butt joint, corner joint, edge joint, and t-joint weld.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

 

STANDARD 4.0

 

Students will set up a typical mechanical drive system (gear and belt drive) found in an industrial setting.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

4.1       Correctly setup a typical gear driven mechanical drive.

4.1.1        Correctly setup a typical belt driven mechanical drive.

 

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

4.1A    Safely and correctly disassemble a typical gear driven mechanical drive.

4.1B    Safely and correctly assemble a typical gear driven mechanical drive.

4.1C    Safely and correctly disassemble a typical belt driven mechanical drive.

4.1D    Safely and correctly assemble a typical belt driven mechanical drive.

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given a working gear driven mechanical drive, the student will correctly dissemble and reassemble the drive in a specified amount of time .
  • Given a working belt driven mechanical drive, the student will correctly dissemble and reassemble the drive in a specified amount of time .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

STANDARD 5.0

Students will perform basic piping and auxiliaries (including bolted flange, screw pipe, etc.) found in a typical industrial setting.

 

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

5.1      Put together a bolted flange assembly, given a piping sketch.

5.2      Put together a screw pipe assembly, given a piping sketch.

 

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

5.1A    Views a piping sketch, selects necessary piping parts, and assembles a bolted flange assembly.

5.1B    Views a piping sketch, selects necessary piping parts, and assembles a screw flange assembly.

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

This is a sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Assemble various types of piping assemblies, given sketches, a general piping parts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

STANDARD 6.0

 

Students will explain the theory, component operation, and fluid power in a basic industrial hydraulics system.

 

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

6.1     Explain how to minimize failures in hydraulic equipment.

6.2     Perform regular preventive maintenance on hydraulic equipment and controls.

6.3     Interpret ANSI symbols and drawings to explain the functions of specific hydraulic parts.

.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

6.1A    Explains how to minimize failures in hydraulic equipment.

6.1B    Performs preventive maintenance on hydraulic equipment.

 

6.1C    Interpret ANSI symbols and drawings to explain the functions of specific hydraulic parts.

 

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

This is a sample project of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Determine (troubleshoot) an operational hydraulic system.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTRICAL II

 

STANDARD 7.0

 

Students will construct and test fundamental basic digital logic circuits (gates, counters, oscillators, and switches).

 

 
LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

7.1       Construct logic circuits using gates..

7.2       Construct logic circuits using flip-flops, counters, and gates.

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

7.1A    Analyzes the function of gates in logic circuits.

7.1B    Constructs logic circuits using AND, OR, NOR, and XOR gates as described by logic statements and schematic circuits

7.1C    Analyzes the function of flip-flops, counters, and gates in logic circuits.

7.1D    Constructs logic circuits using flip-flops, counters, and gates as described by given logic statements and schematic circuits.

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

 

  • Create a circuits wing AND,OR, NOR, and XOR gates to execute given Boolean expressions based on several inputs.
  • Create circuits using flip-flops to act as a counter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

International Technology Education Association. Standards for Technological Literacy: Content for the Study of Technology. International Technology Education Association. Reston, VA, 2000.

Mathematics concepts and skills. Computer Science concepts and skills.


 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

STANDARD 8.0

 

Students will demonstrate advanced troubleshooting techniques.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

8.1       Troubleshoot an electromechanical system.

 

 

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

8.1       Given blueprints of a typical electromechanical system and after confirming the correct operation of an operational electromechanical system will systematically and logically troubleshoot, within a given amount of time, the system after the instructor has put in a problem.

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

These are sample projects of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion

  • Instructor sets up an operational electromechanical system (motor driving a pump with a coupling, an instrumentation loop, etc.) and ensures the students understands the system. The instructor then puts a problem in the system and takes the role of an operator and tells the student of the symptoms of the problem. The student then begins to diagnose/troubleshoot the system. The student is given a definite amount of time to systematically and logically troubleshoot the problem.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Math, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication

Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

 

 

 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

 

STANDARD 9.0

 

Students will setup, identify instrument parameters, and change instrument calibration           of smart instrumentation using the proper communicator.

 

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

9.1       Correctly set up a communication loop for a smart pressure, flow, temperature, or level-measuring instrument.

 

 

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

9.1A    Correctly set up communication loop for a smart pressure, flow, temperature, or level-measuring instrument.

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

This is a sample project of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given a working smart instrument and its corresponding communicator (Honeywell or Rosemount instrument and its communicator), the student will set up the communication loop, determine the basic parameters of the instrument (tag number, calibration range, etc.) and change one parameter of the instrument.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development


 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

 

STANDARD 10.0

 

Students will explain the operation of a basic programmable logic controller.

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

10.1     Correctly set up a communication loop for a basic programmable logic controller.

10.2     Correctly identify the basic parts of a programmable controller and their function.

 

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

10.1A Safely and correctly connect a communication loop between an interfacing computer and a basic programmable logic controller.

10.1B Correctly identify the parts of a programmable controller and their specific functions (power supply, CPU, input modules, output modules, analog input and/or modules).

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

This is a sample project of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given a working PLC, an operator interface, and an interfacing computer will software allowing a user to see the PLC’s program, the student will set up a communication loop, view the program and explain the program’s purpose, and identify the basic parts of a programmable logic controller.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development


 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

 

STANDARD 11.0

 

Students will explain the basic operation of gear, centrifugal, and positive displacement pumps typically found in industrial settings.

 

 

LEARNING EXPECTATIONS

 

The student will:

11.1     Explain the basic operation of a gear pump.

11.2     Explain the basic operation of a centrifugal pump.

11.3     Explain the basic operation of a positive displacement pumps

 

 

PERFORMANCE STANDARDS: EVIDENCE STANDARD IS MET

 

The student:

11.1A Tear down and reassemble a gear pump.

11.2A Tear down and reassemble a centrifugal pump.

11.3A  Tear down and reassemble a positive displacement pump.

 

 

SAMPLE PERFORMANCE TASKS

 

This is a sample project of the type and scale recommended to address one or more of the

learning expectations for this standard. Other projects can be used at the instructor’s discretion.

  • Given a gear pump, centrifugal pump, and a positive displacement pump, the student will safely and successfully tear down the pump, identify the basic parts of each pump, and reassembly the pump.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTEGRATION LINKAGES

 

Science, Computer Skills, Research and Writing Skills, Language Arts, Communication Skills, Leadership Skills, Teamwork Skills, English IV Communications for Life, Algebra, Geometry, Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS), SkillsUSA, Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC), Associated General Contractors (AGC), National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Environmental Protection Agency, United States Department of Labor, Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development


 

 

 

ELECTROMECHANICAL II

 

 

 

SAMPLING OF AVAILABLE RESOURCES

 

Ø      Core Curriculum, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Welding Level One, National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. Also known as the Contren Learning Series materials.

 

Ø      Multistate Academic and Vocational Curriculum Consortium (MAVCC), Oklahoma Department of Vocational and Technical Education

 

Ø       Total Quality Curriculum, National SkillsUSA

 

Ø       Professional Development Program, National SkillsUSA—www.skillsusa.org

 

Ø       Power Tool Institute, www.powertoolinstitute.com

 

Ø      Fluke Educators Portal, http://support.fluke.com/educators

 

Ø      National Association of Home Builders, www.nahb.org

 

Ø      International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, www.ibew.org

 

Ø      National Association of Women in Construction, www.nawiceducation.org

 

Ø      Homebuilders Institute, www.hbi.org

 

Ø      United States Department of Labor, www.dol.gov

 

Ø      United States Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, www.dol.gov (link)

 

Ø      Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills, www.dol.gov (link)

 

Ø      Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), www.osha.gov

 

Ø      Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), www.epa.gov

 

Ø      National Safety Council, www.nsc.org

 

Ø      National Skills Standards Board Institute, www.nssb.org

 

Ø      Vocational Information Center, www.khake.com

 

Ø      Power Tool Institute (PTI), www.powertoolinstitute.com

 

 

 

Ø      Associated Builders and Contractors, www.abc.org

 

Ø      Associated General Contractors of America, www.agcofamerica.org

 

Ø      Building Officials and Code Administration International, www.bocai.org